OPEN UNIVERSITY GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY - LONDON BRANCH

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LOUGS DAYTRIPS 2019

Please use the Registration Form to express your interest in these events and obtain more information.


Fieldwork is an essential part of geology. Whether it is someone looking at rocks for the first time or people engaged in speciality research, the field element is essential.

It is recommended to register with the event's organiser so that you can be notified of any change, and to avoid events being over-subscribed. We will always try to contact anyone who has registered an interest in a trip in advance. If you have registered and find that you will not be able to attend please inform the event organiser to allow someone else to take your place.

Details of events more than two months ahead are provisional. None of the event descriptions here constitute a brochure under the Package Travel Regulations (1992).

Note that day field trips generally carry a charge of £3.00 to cover costs. Where an event carries an admission fee, more will be charged, and the amount should be made clear in the event details.

Upcoming daytrips

A linear walk along the Southbank of the Thames from Blackfriars Station to London Bridge. The walk will be approximately 1.5 to 2 hours long and will include the history and some geology of this important stretch of the river. The walk will finish at Southwark Cathedral, this is close to London Bridge Station and Borough Market.

Contact: Sue Vernon


Visit to the Kings Dyke Nature Reserve exploring the fossil beds of the Oxford Clay exposed at King's Dyke

The Oxford Clay dates back to the Jurassic period 140 million years ago. At that time Kings Dyke would have been at the bottom of a warm tropical ocean. The seas would have been full of various species of shellfish such as ammonite and belemnite, found in abundance in the fossil area. Middle sized predators would have included ichthyosaurs (a dolphin like creature) and plesiosaurs. Both of these would have been about 4-6m in length as would the Jurassic sharks and crocodiles. Fossils of all of these creatures are regularly found in the fossil area. Fossilised wood is also regularly found.

Of a much larger scale, a number of fossil remains have been found of a large filter feeding fish called Leedsichthys and ocean going predators such as pliosaurs, both in excess of 20m in length.

Contact: Nicole Gay


**Postponed - Date TBC**

Contact: Alan Wilson


Details to follow.

Contact: John Lonergan


Details to follow.

Contact: John Lonergan


Details to follow.

Contact: Sue Vernon


Details to follow.

Contact: Richard Trounson


Details to follow.

Contact: Alan Wilson


Details to follow.

Contact: Alan Wilson