OPEN UNIVERSITY GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY - LONDON BRANCH

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LOUGS LECTURES 2018

London Branch organizes a series of lectures on a variety of geological themes. The guest lecturers are drawn from the ranks of professional and serious lay geologists.
Please use the Registration Form to express your interest in these events and obtain more information.

Meetings are held on Thursdays at 19.00 at the Parish Room of the All Saints church.

ADDRESS: ALL SAINTS' PARISH ROOM, 7 Margaret Street, W1W 8JG
Entrance via main gate - doors open at 18:15 for socialising. The nearest tube station is Oxford Circus.

All Saints Front view

All Saints - front view

All Saints Map

All Saints Map

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Lectures carry a nominal admission of £5.00 to cover costs, payable on the evening.

Before the monthly lectures, some of the members organise to meet informally for a bite to eat in one of the eateries in the neighbourhood. If you would like to be included on the meal mailing list contact Gina Barnes, who co-ordinates the arrangements, or email info@lougs.org.uk and we will put you in touch.

After the lectures, some of us usually go on for an informal drink. All are welcome.

Upcoming lectures

The Mars Science Laboratory Rover, Curiosity, has travelled over 11 miles across the surface of Mars, investigating the rocks along its path, observing the weather, and studying the landforms. The data have revealed that a lake once occupied the crater, and that the sediments that were deposited in that lake, underwent changes after their deposition, resulting in clay minerals, veins of Ca-sulfate, bleached zones and raised ridges and nodules. The talk will summarise the mission progress from landing to the current position, visiting the highlights along the way.

Contact: Anna Saich


Microfossils have been used as tools in hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation for over 140 years, but they have taken on an increasingly important role over the last twenty years. The advent of horizontal drilling techniques has put greater demands on the micropalaeontologist at the rig site and many oil companies now have micropalaeontology specialists working 12 hour shifts around the clock monitoring the microfossil recovery as the wells are drilled.

Optimal placement and steering of production wells within “sweet spots” in the oil reservoir section can enhance recovery by 30%. With oil prices beginning to rise once again, the micropalaeontologist can have a major impact on oil production and company profits. In addition to this the unsung micropalaeontologist has always played an important role in major engineering projects, creating equally major savings for her Majesty’s treasury.

Just how valuable are the few micropalaeontologists we train and, if we don’t create more of these specialists, will they soon be as extinct as the microfossils they work on?

Contact: Anna Saich


TBC

Contact: Anna Saich


TBC

Contact: Anna Saich


TBC

Contact: Anna Saich