OPEN UNIVERSITY GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY - LONDON BRANCH

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LOUGS LECTURES 2018

London Branch organizes a series of lectures on a variety of geological themes. The guest lecturers are drawn from the ranks of professional and serious lay geologists.

Please use the Registration Form to express your interest in these events and obtain more information.

Meetings are held on Thursdays at 19.00 at the Parish Room of the All Saints church.

ADDRESS: ALL SAINTS' PARISH ROOM, 7 Margaret Street, W1W 8JG

Entrance via main gate - doors open at 18:15 for socialising. The nearest tube station is Oxford Circus.

All Saints Front view

All Saints - front view

All Saints Map

All Saints Map

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Lectures carry a nominal admission of £5.00 to cover costs, payable on the evening.

Before the monthly lectures, some of the members organise to meet informally for a bite to eat in one of the eateries in the neighbourhood. If you would like to be included on the meal mailing list contact Gina Barnes, who co-ordinates the arrangements, or email info@lougs.org.uk and we will put you in touch.

After the lectures, some of us usually go on for an informal drink. All are welcome.

Examples of the use of Middle Jurassic ammonites as used in the subdivision of the Inferior Oolite Formation in Dorset and Somerset. The talk will include an introduction about the ammonites as a group and the features that render them useful in the subdivision of sedimentary rocks. Examples from South West England are used to demonstrate the time resolution that can be achieved using ammonites and how this information can be applied to other regions. A short history of key persons involved in this work will be presented.

Contact: Anna Saich


Gas hydrates are a natural ice-like mixture of water and methane gas. In recent years they have received increasing interest, partly due to their hazard potential due to climatic warming and partly due to the estimated high volume of untapped resource. Commercial interest in hydrates as an unconventional source of natural gas has been driven by increasing global gas use. If commercial development is successful it could help meet demand, especially in areas lacking other resource options.

Hydrates are found throughout the Polar Regions in areas with significant permafrost. However, the Arctic is also a unique and fragile environment, meaning any proposals for industrial development here are subject to intense scrutiny and debate. Therefore, it is not simply sufficient to consider the natural resource when considering potential development; there are a number of possible consequences environmentally, socially and economically. Any large-scale development will involve many interested parties, all of whom have different priorities. All these impacts and interests must then be balanced when appraising overall potential. By no longer considering the geologic system in isolation the consequences of development can be seen in their proper context, evaluating whether the resource should be pursued here at all.

Contact: Anna Saich


The Mars Science Laboratory Rover, Curiosity, has travelled over 11 miles across the surface of Mars, investigating the rocks along its path, observing the weather, and studying the landforms. The data have revealed that a lake once occupied the crater, and that the sediments that were deposited in that lake, underwent changes after their deposition, resulting in clay minerals, veins of Ca-sulfate, bleached zones and raised ridges and nodules. The talk will summarise the mission progress from landing to the current position, visiting the highlights along the way.

Contact: Anna Saich


TBC

Contact: Anna Saich


TBC

Contact: Anna Saich


TBC

Contact: Anna Saich


TBC

Contact: Anna Saich